City Health Dashboard

Empowering cities to create thriving communities:  Explore health in your city

Source: https://www.cityhealthdashboard.com/

Learn how other communities have successfully woven health into their decision-making around issues such as education, access to affordable housing, and unemployment. This section includes new articles on how cities are using the Dashboard, posts from the City Health Dashboard team, and feature stories that show how cities are building healthier communities.

Metrics Background

The City Health Dashboard allows you to see where the nation’s 500 largest cities stand on 36 key measures of health and factors affecting health across five areas: Health Behaviors, Social and Economic Factors, Physical Environment, Health Outcomes, and Clinical Care. These categories align with those used in the County Health Rankings & Roadmaps, a well-known program that provides health data at the county level. Data come from federal, state, and other datasets with rigorous standards for collection and analysis. The Dashboard team chose these measures, with guidance from a City Advisory Committee, because cities can act on them, they were collected within the last four years, they are updated regularly, and they are backed by evidence. Below, you will find information on each metric including a metric description, data source, years of data, how the measure is calculated, and a link to more information.

Expansion of Successful Online Population Health Resource Will Give More U.S. Cities Access to Key Health Data

Hundreds of United States cities will be able to identify their most pressing health needs more accurately—thanks to a nationwide expansion of the City Health Dashboard, an innovative health data visualization tool.

Created by the Department of Population Health at NYU Langone Medical Center and the Robert F. Wagner School of Public Service at NYU, in partnership with the National Resource Network, the City Health Dashboard launched earlier this yearin four cities. It will expand to 500 additional cities over the next two years through a $3.4 million grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation—with the ultimate goal of becoming a central health improvement planning resource for U.S. cities with populations of 70,000 or more, or one-third of the U.S. population.

Users of the City Health Dashboard have the ability to view their city’s performance in 26 key measures of health, like obesity and primary care physician coverage; and drivers of health status, such as housing affordability, high school graduation rate, food access, and opioid deaths. For many of the measures, data can be accessed at the neighborhood level.

Marc Gourevitch, MD, MPH, chair of the Department of Population Health at NYU Langone and the program’s principal architect, points out that the City Health Dashboard responds to increased interest by cities in data on benchmark measures of health, health determinants, and equity. Currently most data of this scope has only been available at the county level—posing challenges to urban health improvement efforts.

“There is an old adage: ‘what gets measured is what gets done,” Dr. Gourevitch says. “Community leaders want accurate, actionable, and precise data to advance initiatives that improve health, bring down costs, and focus on community wellbeing. We’re excited to be at the vanguard of providing this important information to cities across the country.”

How the City Health Dashboard Works

The City Health Dashboard places in the hands of city leaders and community organizations a responsive and highly reliable web interface with regularly refreshed health-related data—overseen by a team of epidemiologists, population health and urban policy experts, and geographic information system specialists.

Data presented by the City Health Dashboard are drawn from federal and state governments and other organizations that apply rigorous methodology to data collection, including the U.S. Census Bureau, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Environmental Protection Agency.

“In our work with cities across the nation, we’ve learned that their governments want to improve the physical health of their residents as well as the fiscal health of their municipalities,” says David Eichenthal, executive director of National Resource Network. “Nationally scaling this resource will help place health at the center of local agenda-setting, improve efficiencies, save city-level expenses, and address the need for comparable data at the local level.”

The expanded City Health Dashboard will offer enhanced technical support features to cities more actively engaged in data-driven policy-making. All cities will have access to features to compare peer cities and neighborhoods, tools for tracking performance, and resources to deep-dive into more advanced microdata interfacing.

The four pilot cities—Flint, Michigan; Kansas City, Kansas; Providence, Rhode Island; and Waco, Texas—are already incorporating the City Health Dashboard into their efforts to improve health. For example, Prosper Waco, a nonprofit organization, is using the site to help determine its inner city’s need for services related to high teen birth rate.

Says Dr. Gourevitch: “We hope the site will serve as a platform for cities to share and gather knowledge to improve outcomes on some of the most pressing health challenges our society faces.”

National Center on Educational Outcomes Brief 15: Students with Disabilities and Chronic Absenteeism

Students with Disabilities 
National Center on Educational Outcomes Brief 15: Students with Disabilities and Chronic Absenteeism
https://bit.ly/2Ke9Mdi 
This brief provides information about chronic absenteeism and possible implications for students with disabilities when a state selects it as a measure of school quality or student success. The brief highlights both the benefits and potential risks in light of requirements in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504), and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The brief also suggests actions that states might consider taking to address chronic absences among students with disabilities at the state and local levels as they work to include this new measure in accountability systems. Published by ICI MN National Center on Educational Outcomes (NCEO).

MLTSS for People for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Strategies for Success

Managed Long-term Services and Supports (MLTSS) 
MLTSS for People for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Strategies for Success
https://bit.ly/2L8obcg 
The National Association of States United for Aging and Disabilities (NASUAD), along with the National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disabilities Services (NASDDDS) and Ari Ne’eman of Mysupport.com are the authors of this important report MLTSS for People for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Strategies for Success. 
Because there are unique challenges in implementing a managed long-term services and supports (MLTSS) program for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), the report provides context on the intersection of program design and participant advocacy and outlines successful strategies for both states and health plans. Promising practices from the few MLTSS programs delivering I/DD services are highlighted throughout.  Check it out if your state is engaged in MLTSS or is thinking about/planning for the transition.  

Opportunities for Improving Programs and Services for Children with Disabilities 

Health Services 
Opportunities for Improving Programs and Services for Children with Disabilities 
Source: https://bit.ly/2k3LxDF 
While a variety of services and programs exist to support the needs of children with disabilities and their families, a focus on achieving specific near- and long-term goals that help prepare for adulthood and coordination of care within and across service sectors are integral to encouraging healthy growth and development, says a new 
report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.  The committee that conducted the study and wrote the report examined federal, state, and local programs and services in a range of areas, such as health care, special education, transition to adulthood, vocational rehabilitation, and social needs care.

Work-Life Balance & Disability

Source: http://work-life-disability.org/#home 

The NIDILRR-funded project on Getting and Keeping People with Disabilities in the Workforce: Negotiating Work, Life, and Disability recently debuted a new web resource, Work-Life Balance & Disability, resulting from the project’s exploration of individual and organizational factors that support effective work-life management among employed people with disabilities. The site includes personal stories, plain language research briefs, and other resources. A polling feature enables collection of data to help inform future projects related to the well-being and employment success of people with disabilities. The site will continue to be updated with new polling questions, featured publications, and more stories from employed people with disabilities.

Responsive Practice | Institute on Disability/UCED

“Responsive Practice builds on knowledge that providers already have and identifies opportunities to maximize wellness for individuals with disabilities,” explains Kimberly Phillips, DPH Principal Investigator and co-author of the training.” 

Source: Responsive Practice | Institute on Disability/UCED

Responsive Practice 
Responsive Practice: Providing Health Care & Screenings to Individuals with Disabilities 
https://bit.ly/2ryQ30t
The New Hampshire Disability and Public Health (DPH) project’s Responsive Practice training is now available online, on-demand, and is free for a limited time. Responsive Practice enhances health care providers’ ability to deliver disability-competent care that is accessible to people with intellectual, mobility, and other disabilities.

Activity for All Children | CDC

Everybody needs physical activity for good health. However, most children do not participate in any organized physical activity during non-school hours. See how inclusive after-school programs can help increase physical activity among children of all abilities.

Source: Activity for All Children | Features | CDC

Children and adolescents ages 6 years and older should perform at least one hour of physical activity each day. This amount of physical activity helps control weight, improves mental health, bone health and fitness, and reduces risk factors for chronic diseases such as heart disease and diabetes. Nevertheless, many children and adolescents are not getting this suggested amount of daily physical activity.

The lack of physical activity only increases for youth with a disability1. In fact, compared to youth without disability, youth with a disability have a 35 percent higher prevalence of overweight and obesity2 with an increased risk of secondary conditions associated with being overweight3.

After-school programs across the country have been working hard to provide opportunities for youth to get the recommended amount of physical activity.  The most current data show that 10.2 million children take part in some after-school program and this number continues to rise4.

CDC’s funded partner, the National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability (NCHPAD), is working with one such after-school program, Girls on the Run, to make the program more inclusive of young girls with disabilities.

Girls on the Run is a physical activity-based positive youth development program for young girls in grades 3 through 8. The program uses a fun, experience-based curriculum to teach life skills through dynamic, interactive lessons and running games.  Running and physical activity are used to inspire and to motivate the girls, to encourage lifelong health and fitness, and to build confidence through accomplishment. At the end of each 10-week season, the girls, their coaches, and running buddies (family and community volunteers) complete a celebratory 5k running event that gives them a tangible sense of achievement and a framework for setting and achieving life goals.

Request for Information on the Future Direction of the Rehabilitation Training Program

Deadline: July 3,  2018
https://bit.ly/2rroWEn
The U.S. Department of Education (Department) is requesting input on the portfolio of grants supported under the Rehabilitation Training Program, specifically those supported under the Rehabilitation Long-Term Training, Rehabilitation Short-Term Training, and Innovative Rehabilitation Training authorities to determine whether the activities funded under the Rehabilitation Training Program are aligned with the goals of the Department and the needs of State vocational rehabilitation (VR) agencies. We will use the information gathered in response to this request for information (RFI) to determine whether any changes are needed in designing and implementing grant activities under this program, including the specific mix of activities supported each year.
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