Internet and cell phone usage patterns among young adults with intellectual disabilities

Source: JARID

Authors Cristina Jenaro, Noelia Flores, Maribel Cruz, Ma Carmen Pérez, Vanessa Vega, Víctor A Torres

First published: 24 July 2017

Abstract

Background

The risks and opportunities associated with the use of technologies are of growing research interest. Patterns of technology usage illuminate these opportunities and risks. However, no studies have assessed the usage patterns (frequency, duration, and intensity) and related factors in young people with intellectual disabilities.

Methods

Questionnaires on Internet and cell phone usage patterns, the Internet Over-Use Scale and the Cell-Phone Over-Use Scale, as well as the Beck Depression Inventory were filled out in one-on-one interviews of 216 youth with intellectual disabilities.

Results

Young people with disabilities make more social and recreational rather than educational use of these tools, and show higher rates of excessive use of both technologies than a comparison group of 410 young people without disabilities. Also, their overuse is associated with other unhealthy behaviors.

Conclusion

The framework of support needs of people with disabilities should be considered to promote healthy Internet and cell phone use.

What Effect Does Transition Have on Health and Well-Being in Young People with Intellectual Disabilities? A Systematic Review

 Source: JARID

Background Transition to adulthood might be a risk period for poor health in people with intellectual disabilities. However, the present authors could find no synthesis of evidence on health and well-being outcomes during transition in this population. This review aimed to answer this question. MethodPRISMA/MOOSE guidelines were followed. Search terms were defined, electronic searches of six databases were conducted, reference lists and key journals were reviewed, and grey literature was searched. Papers were selected based on clear inclusion criteria. Data were extracted from the selected papers, and their quality was systematically reviewed. The review was prospectively registered on PROSPERO: CRD42015016905. Results A total of 15 985 articles were extracted; of these, 17 met the inclusion criteria. The results of these articles were mixed but suggested the presence of some health and well-being issues in this population during transition to adulthood, including obesity and sexual health issues. Conclusion This review reveals a gap in the literature on transition and health and points to the need for future work in this area.

Prospects for an Impact Evaluation of Project SEARCH: An Evaluability Assessment

Source: Prospects for an Impact Evaluation of Project SEARCH: An Evaluability Assessment

Authors: Arif A. Mamun, Lori Timmins, and David C. Stapleton

Project SEARCH has emerged as a promising program to address the challenges related to improving employment outcomes of youth with disabilities. It is a high school to work transition program that integrates employers and businesses with other educational and community rehabilitation service providers to engage youth with disabilities in paid work experiences. Recent monitoring and evaluation efforts suggest promising employment outcomes for Project SEARCH participants, but there has not yet been a rigorous impact evaluation with a large sample to demonstrate that these outcomes are substantially better than they would be if the participants had only relied on services and supports that are available outside of Project SEARCH.

In this report we present several design options for a rigorous impact evaluation of Project SEARCH. Relying on information we gathered from document reviews and from site visits conducted for this evaluability assessment, we propose two leading evaluation designs: one under the existing setting, where we take Project SEARCH sites, students, and other partners as given; and another under a demonstration setting, where we allow for the evaluation to play a role in determining the setting within which these players interact. We also discuss a few other alternative design options that we considered, but have concluded they are less appealing than those recommended.

How I bridge 2 worlds as a deaf medical student

Growing up as a deaf person has given me unique insights into patient care, which I hope to incorporate into my practice when I’m a physician.

Source: How I bridge 2 worlds as a deaf medical student

 

I was born profoundly deaf in both ears, which means I could only hear sound above 95 decibels. Without hearing aids, I could hear extremely loud sounds, such as a plane taking off or a train going by, only if I was near them. With hearing aids, I could hear sound at 40 decibels and up, so I could understand one-on-one conversations as long as there was no background noise, the person didn’t mumble and I could see his or her mouth clearly.

Before starting medical school, I got a cochlear implant, which helps me hear so much more than I could before. When I listen to music now, I can hear all the different sounds rather than one static sound, and it’s much easier to differentiate between the instruments. Understanding speech has also become much easier. I now communicate orally with hearing people and via sign language with deaf people. However, I am still deaf, and there are still times when I am unable to understand what people are saying, such as group settings where there’s a lot of ambient noise.