City Health Dashboard

Empowering cities to create thriving communities:  Explore health in your city

Source: https://www.cityhealthdashboard.com/

Learn how other communities have successfully woven health into their decision-making around issues such as education, access to affordable housing, and unemployment. This section includes new articles on how cities are using the Dashboard, posts from the City Health Dashboard team, and feature stories that show how cities are building healthier communities.

Metrics Background

The City Health Dashboard allows you to see where the nation’s 500 largest cities stand on 36 key measures of health and factors affecting health across five areas: Health Behaviors, Social and Economic Factors, Physical Environment, Health Outcomes, and Clinical Care. These categories align with those used in the County Health Rankings & Roadmaps, a well-known program that provides health data at the county level. Data come from federal, state, and other datasets with rigorous standards for collection and analysis. The Dashboard team chose these measures, with guidance from a City Advisory Committee, because cities can act on them, they were collected within the last four years, they are updated regularly, and they are backed by evidence. Below, you will find information on each metric including a metric description, data source, years of data, how the measure is calculated, and a link to more information.

Expansion of Successful Online Population Health Resource Will Give More U.S. Cities Access to Key Health Data

Hundreds of United States cities will be able to identify their most pressing health needs more accurately—thanks to a nationwide expansion of the City Health Dashboard, an innovative health data visualization tool.

Created by the Department of Population Health at NYU Langone Medical Center and the Robert F. Wagner School of Public Service at NYU, in partnership with the National Resource Network, the City Health Dashboard launched earlier this yearin four cities. It will expand to 500 additional cities over the next two years through a $3.4 million grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation—with the ultimate goal of becoming a central health improvement planning resource for U.S. cities with populations of 70,000 or more, or one-third of the U.S. population.

Users of the City Health Dashboard have the ability to view their city’s performance in 26 key measures of health, like obesity and primary care physician coverage; and drivers of health status, such as housing affordability, high school graduation rate, food access, and opioid deaths. For many of the measures, data can be accessed at the neighborhood level.

Marc Gourevitch, MD, MPH, chair of the Department of Population Health at NYU Langone and the program’s principal architect, points out that the City Health Dashboard responds to increased interest by cities in data on benchmark measures of health, health determinants, and equity. Currently most data of this scope has only been available at the county level—posing challenges to urban health improvement efforts.

“There is an old adage: ‘what gets measured is what gets done,” Dr. Gourevitch says. “Community leaders want accurate, actionable, and precise data to advance initiatives that improve health, bring down costs, and focus on community wellbeing. We’re excited to be at the vanguard of providing this important information to cities across the country.”

How the City Health Dashboard Works

The City Health Dashboard places in the hands of city leaders and community organizations a responsive and highly reliable web interface with regularly refreshed health-related data—overseen by a team of epidemiologists, population health and urban policy experts, and geographic information system specialists.

Data presented by the City Health Dashboard are drawn from federal and state governments and other organizations that apply rigorous methodology to data collection, including the U.S. Census Bureau, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Environmental Protection Agency.

“In our work with cities across the nation, we’ve learned that their governments want to improve the physical health of their residents as well as the fiscal health of their municipalities,” says David Eichenthal, executive director of National Resource Network. “Nationally scaling this resource will help place health at the center of local agenda-setting, improve efficiencies, save city-level expenses, and address the need for comparable data at the local level.”

The expanded City Health Dashboard will offer enhanced technical support features to cities more actively engaged in data-driven policy-making. All cities will have access to features to compare peer cities and neighborhoods, tools for tracking performance, and resources to deep-dive into more advanced microdata interfacing.

The four pilot cities—Flint, Michigan; Kansas City, Kansas; Providence, Rhode Island; and Waco, Texas—are already incorporating the City Health Dashboard into their efforts to improve health. For example, Prosper Waco, a nonprofit organization, is using the site to help determine its inner city’s need for services related to high teen birth rate.

Says Dr. Gourevitch: “We hope the site will serve as a platform for cities to share and gather knowledge to improve outcomes on some of the most pressing health challenges our society faces.”

Activity for All Children | CDC

Everybody needs physical activity for good health. However, most children do not participate in any organized physical activity during non-school hours. See how inclusive after-school programs can help increase physical activity among children of all abilities.

Source: Activity for All Children | Features | CDC

Children and adolescents ages 6 years and older should perform at least one hour of physical activity each day. This amount of physical activity helps control weight, improves mental health, bone health and fitness, and reduces risk factors for chronic diseases such as heart disease and diabetes. Nevertheless, many children and adolescents are not getting this suggested amount of daily physical activity.

The lack of physical activity only increases for youth with a disability1. In fact, compared to youth without disability, youth with a disability have a 35 percent higher prevalence of overweight and obesity2 with an increased risk of secondary conditions associated with being overweight3.

After-school programs across the country have been working hard to provide opportunities for youth to get the recommended amount of physical activity.  The most current data show that 10.2 million children take part in some after-school program and this number continues to rise4.

CDC’s funded partner, the National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability (NCHPAD), is working with one such after-school program, Girls on the Run, to make the program more inclusive of young girls with disabilities.

Girls on the Run is a physical activity-based positive youth development program for young girls in grades 3 through 8. The program uses a fun, experience-based curriculum to teach life skills through dynamic, interactive lessons and running games.  Running and physical activity are used to inspire and to motivate the girls, to encourage lifelong health and fitness, and to build confidence through accomplishment. At the end of each 10-week season, the girls, their coaches, and running buddies (family and community volunteers) complete a celebratory 5k running event that gives them a tangible sense of achievement and a framework for setting and achieving life goals.

Responsive Practice Providing Health Care & Screenings to Individuals with Disabilities

The Responsive Practice training is online, on-demand, free for a limited time, and eligible for continuing education & continuing medical education credits. Responsive Practice enhances health care providers’ ability to deliver culturally competent, accessible care to people with intellectual, mobility, and other disabilities. Learning objectives:

  • Describe disparities in health experienced by people with disabilities compared to people without disabilities;
  • Recognize barriers to accessing health care & preventive services; and
  • Acquire strategies & approaches to provide disability-competent,responsive care.

Nurses

Southern NH AHEC is an Approved Provider of continuing nursing education by the Northeast Multistate Division (NE-MSD), an accredited approver of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

Physicians

Southern NH AHEC, accredited by the NH Medical Society, designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s). Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

1.0 contact hours. Activity Number: 1226

Responsive Practice Training Flyer 2018

Inclusive Innovation in Parks and Recreation – News & Media | Health.gov

Inclusive Innovation in Parks and Recreation

Source: Inclusive Innovation in Parks and Recreation – News & Media | Health.gov

By Allison Tubbs, Project Coordinator, National Center on Health, Physical Activity and DisabilityExternal Link: You are leaving health.gov and Maureen Acquino, Program Specialist, National Recreation and Park AssociationExternal Link: You are leaving health.gov

Park and recreation agencies are leading the way to inclusive communities across the country. Since the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) began in 1990, park and recreation agencies across the United States have made their facilities accessible and inclusive to those with disabilities. Although parks and public spaces are mandated to meet ADA requirements, there is much more that can be done to foster inclusion in all park and recreation programing, initiatives, and health and wellness efforts. To address this issue, the National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA) joined forces with the National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability and Lakeshore Foundation to launch Parks for InclusionExternal Link: You are leaving health.gov. Parks for Inclusion is NRPA’s formal pledge to the Commit to Inclusion’s Partnership for Inclusive HealthExternal Link: You are leaving health.gov. The pledge ensures that all people have equal access to the benefits of local parks and recreation. Parks for Inclusion supports built environment enhancements, model policy development, and best practices for program implementation to increase access to health opportunities for the following populations:

  • Those with physical and cognitive disabilities
  • The LGBTQ community
  • Racial and ethnic minorities and new Americans

“NRPA defines inclusion as removing barriers, both physical and theoretical, so that all people have an equal opportunity to enjoy the benefits of parks and recreation.”

Inclusion Report

To provide greater insight into how park and recreation agencies ensure that all members of their communities can enjoy parks and recreation, NRPA developed a needs assessment survey and Inclusion Report. Of the key findings, it was noted that two in five park and recreation agencies have a formal policy that ensures they are inclusive. The report identified some of the greatest challenges agencies face in being more inclusive – funding, staffing, facility space, and staff training. Follow this link to read the full reportExternal Link: You are leaving health.gov and view more findings at the infographic below.

Making an Impact

To kickstart opportunities, a microgrant programExternal Link: You are leaving health.gov was designed to award four local park and recreation agencies with small-seed funds to implement innovative programs and enhancements so individuals with a disability could participate in healthy living opportunities. In Minneapolis, the project “Sense TentsExternal Link: You are leaving health.gov” was implemented at local community event. This project provided a space with sensory friendly objects and activities for event participants with autism or other sensory disorders. Moving forward, the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board will have these tents available at various outdoor events and provide information on how each sensory item is meant to be used and its benefits. Other projects included a Learn to Ride Adaptive Bike program at the McBeth Recreation Center in Austin, Texas, an intergenerational community garden project at Shirley M. Shark Historic Park in Prichard, Alabama, and an inclusive Grow Up Green Club for preschool-age children to explore nature in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Take Action towards Inclusion

Use the Parks for Inclusion resourcesExternal Link: You are leaving health.gov to take action towards inclusion.

 

Spread the Word! Share this post with your network using one of these sample tweets:

  • @NRPA and @NCHPAD discuss inclusive innovation in parks and recreation through #ParksforInclusion. Read more on the BAYW blog http://bit.ly/2IpvbQXExternal Link: You are leaving health.gov.
  • Spread the message that parks are for everyone! Get ideas, resources and success stories on the BAYW blog http://bit.ly/2IpvbQXExternal Link: You are leaving health.gov. #ParksforInclusion

 

Disclaimer: The opinions, findings and conclusions expressed by authors of this blog post are strictly their own and do not necessarily represent the opinion, views or policies of the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health (OASH), the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP) and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

New Hampshire Adults with Disabilities Are Motivated to Quit Smoking

The New Hampshire (NH) Disability & Public Health Project created a new data brief entitled, “New Hampshire Adults with Disabilities Are Motivated to Quit Smoking”.   To better understand smoking trends and attempts to quit among people with disabilities in NH, the NH Disability and Public Health Project (DPH) worked with the NH Tobacco Prevention and Cessation Program to add new questions to the QuitNow-NH intake survey.

Download PDF

PCPID Releases Report on Direct Support Workforce | Administration for Community Living

February 14, 2018 The President’s Committee for People with Intellectual Disabilities (PCPID) has released its 2017 report, America’s Direct Support Workforce Crisis: Effects on People with Intellectual Disabilities, Families, Communities and the U.S. Economy.

Source: PCPID Releases Report on Direct Support Workforce | ACL Administration for Community Living

Direct support professionals (DSPs) provide services and supports that empower people with intellectual disabilities to live in the community.

In the report, PCPID notes that DSPs promote participation in the U.S. economy “by helping people with an (intellectual disability) get jobs and by enabling family members to work.”  The report describes the current state of the DSP workforce as a “crisis,” noting that the average DSP wage is $10.72, most work two or three jobs, and the average annual DSP turnover rate is 45%.

The report also explores:

  • How these issues affect individuals, families, and human services systems.
  • The factors that contribute to these issues
  • Promising practices to strengthen the direct support workforce

PCPID serves in an advisory capacity to the President of the United States and the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) promoting policies and initiatives that support independence and lifelong inclusion of people with intellectual disabilities in their respective communities. The committee includes representatives from several federal agencies and 13 citizen members.

Read the full report (PDF) or a plain-language version (PDF).

Healthy Relationships and Healthy Sexuality for People with Developmental Disability

RRTCDD 2016/17 Fall/Winter Health and Wellness Series

Presenter: Susan Kahan, MA, LCPC (skahan@uic.edu)

Play recording (1 hr 4 min)

Download Sexuality and Healthy Relationships PowerPoint Presentation 

Thursday, January 19, 2017

3:00pm | Eastern Daylight Time

Presenter Biosketch:

Susan is the clinical staff at the University of Illinois at Chicago Developmental Disability Family Clinics, Susan, provides individual and group therapy for clients with a broad range of mental health and behavioral concerns, with a special focus on trauma and sexual abuse of individuals with disabilities. Susan’s clients include children, adolescents and adults. As a member of the Coalition Against Sexual Abuse of Children with Disabilities, she provides consultation and training on trauma-focused intervention for children with disabilities to both trauma and disability agencies, and has spoken at national and international conferences on sexual abuse prevention and intervention for people with IDD. She also provides consultation on working with children with disabilities for law enforcement and child protection agencies. In addition, Susan conducts trainings on healthy sexuality and sexual abuse prevention for provider agencies, schools and parent groups.

Abstract

Everyone desires to love and be loved. The myths and misconceptions about people with intellectual and developmental disability (IDD) often lead to rules and restrictions that make healthy relationships difficult to obtain. This webinar will explore the facts and myths around relationships and sexuality for people with IDD. We will discuss the importance of laying the foundation for healthy relations early on through social skills and sexuality education. Resources and strategies for teaching healthy sexuality will be presented. In addition, we will discuss the role of healthy sexuality education as a primary prevention tool for sexual abuse and other strategies to promote sexual abuse prevention.

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand the myths and misperceptions about individuals with IDD and their impact access to education on healthy relationships and sexuality.
  2. Identify tools and strategies for teaching individuals with IDD about healthy relationships and sexuality.
  3. Understand the role of healthy relationship and sexuality education as a primary sexual abuse prevention strategy.

Smoking Among Ohioans with Disabilities

The Ohio Disability and Health Program has developed a fact sheet to raise awareness regarding smoking disparities faced by Ohioans with disabilities.

http://go.osu.edu/ODHPsmokingfacts2018 or download ODHP_Smoking-Factsheet-2018.

For further information, please contact Ann Robinson, Program Coordinator, Ohio Disability and Health Program.

Overview Smoking accounts for half a million deaths every year and is of particular concern among people with disabilities (PWD). PWD have unmet healthcare needs and disparities in overall health, chronic health conditions, and health risk behaviors. People with disabilities are especially at risk for smoking and smoking-related illness. According to 2014 data, approximately 662,107 people with disabilities in the United States were current smokers, half of whom reported trying to quit within the past year. Ohio has one of the highest smoking rate disparities (18.5%) in the United States for people with disabilities compared to people without disabilities. These findings suggest a need for effective and targeted smoking cessation programs that are accessible and culturally appropriate for people with disabilities.

At the intersection of chronic disease, disability and health services research: A scoping literature review

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dhjo.2017.12.012

Abstract

Background

There is a concerted effort underway to evaluate and reform our nation’s approach to the health of people with ongoing or elevated needs for care, particularly persons with chronic conditions and/or disabilities.

Objective

This literature review characterizes the current state of knowledge on the measurement of chronic disease and disability in population-based health services research on working age adults (age 18-64).

Methods

Scoping review methods were used to scan the health services research literature published since the year 2000, including medline, psycINFO and manual searches. The guiding question was: “How are chronic conditions and disability defined and measured in studies of healthcare access, quality, utilization or cost?”

Results

Fifty-five studies met the stated inclusion criteria. Chronic conditions were variously defined by brief lists of conditions, broader criteria-based lists, two or more (multiple) chronic conditions, or other constructs. Disability was generally assessed through ADLs/IADLs, functional limitations, activity limitations or program eligibility. A smaller subset of studies used information from both domains to identify a study population or to stratify it by subgroup.

Conclusions

There remains a divide in this literature between studies that rely upon diagnostically-oriented measures and studies that instead rely on functional, activity or other constructs of disability to identify the population of interest. This leads to wide ranging differences in population prevalence and outcome estimates. However, there is also a growing effort to develop methods that account for the overlap between chronic disease and disability and to “segment” this heterogeneous population into policy or practice relevant subgroups.

  • a The Heller School for Social Policy and Management, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA, United States
  • b National Institutes of Health, Clinical Research Center, Rehabilitation Medicine Department, Bethesda, MD, United States
  • c John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, United States
  • d Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, United States
  • e Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, GA, United States
  • f University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, United States
  • g University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, United States
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