Health Matters | The Arc of San Antonio

Amerigroup is proud to support The Arc of San Antonio

Source: Health Matters | The Arc of San Antonio

San Antonio, TX – According to the Centers for Disease Control, adults with disabilities have an almost 60 percent higher rate of obesity than adults without disabilities. The Arc of San Antonio is thrilled to announce that for the second consecutive year, it will be receiving a grant from Anthem Foundation to support the Health and Fitness for All project. This grant was made possible, thanks to an almost $88,000 national grant from Amerigroup’s parent company foundation, which will be used to conduct this health project at nine chapters of The Arc in Texas, Wisconsin, and Kentucky. The mission of The Arc is to enrich the lives of those with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). The Arc of San Antonio operates two day activity centers in San Antonio and works with over 200 adults with I/DD on a daily basis.

“Amerigroup is proud to support The Arc of San Antonio and is dedicated to working to help ensure that Texans of all abilities have programs in their communities that will help ensure they lead healthy lifestyles,” said Tisch Scott, Amerigroup Texas president.

The Health and Fitness for All project utilizes the HealthMatters™ curriculum, which is a training developed by the University of Illinois at Chicago that provides structured information on how to organize and start a tailored physical activity and health education program for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD).

In the first year of the grant, The Arc of San Antonio worked with local Amerigroup officials and Methodist Healthcare Ministries, which supports The Arc’s nursing program, to administer the HealthMatters curriculum to 53 individuals! The curriculum implements a 12-week program which helps increase participants’ knowledge about the importance of healthy eating and staying active.

This year, in collaboration with The YMCA, The Arc will target 75 individuals in underserved areas of San Antonio for the HealthMatters program. “We are excited about the prospect of expanding this sustainable program outside of our four walls and look forward to making a lasting impact on these new participants and their families,” said Marissa Herrera, RN at The Arc of San Antonio, who is coordinating the program locally.

“Leading a healthy lifestyle is difficult for everyone, including people with I/DD. The Arc is fortunate to have the generous support of the Anthem Foundation so we can continue to provide education and resources that will help people with I/DD make healthier decisions in their daily lives,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

 

Editor’s Note: The Arc is not an acronym; always refer to us as The Arc, not The ARC and never ARC. The Arc should be considered as a title or a phrase.

Y Living Center – YMCA of Greater San Antonio

Source: Y Living Center – YMCA of Greater San Antonio

In partnership with The ARC of San Antonio, Health Matters™ is a program designed for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their caregivers who want to become better informed about their own health, nutrition, and fitness.

Child Exercising
  • 12-week program that will meet three times a week
  • 1.5 hours per session (45 minutes of education & 45 minutes of physical activity)
  • Topics Include: Nutrition, Creating an Exercise Plan, Friendship & Support
 For more information contact the Y Living Center at (210)404-0135. 

The Arc Awarded Grant from Anthem Foundation for Health and Fitness for All Project

Source: The Arc Awarded Grant from Anthem Foundation for Health and Fitness for All Project | The Arc Blog

Grant will support programming in Kentucky, Texas and Wisconsin

Washington, DC – The Arc is pleased to announce it has received nearly $88,000 of funding from the Anthem Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Anthem, Inc., to support the Health and Fitness for All project. The project’s training curriculum was developed by the University of Illinois at Chicago, and provides overall structured information on how to organize and start a tailored physical activity and health education program for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). The award will be used to conduct this health project at nine chapters certified in the HealthMatters curriculum at The Arc in Kentucky, Texas, and Wisconsin.

In 2016, The Arc received comparable funding for this initiative from the Anthem Foundation. The program resulted in roughly half of participants reporting a healthy blood pressure, along with 71% of participants revealing increased knowledge of healthy foods and healthy behaviors. Drawing on a very successful first year, the nine chapters will implement the 12-week program with a drive to increase results to approximately 225 participants at the following locations: The Arc of Kentucky, The Arc of Central Kentucky, The Arc of Barren County (KY), The Pointe Arc in Northern Kentucky, The Arc of San Antonio (TX), The Arc of Wisconsin, The Arc Greater Columbia County (WI), The Arc of Racine County, Inc. (WI) and The Arc Fond du Lac (WI).

“Leading a healthy lifestyle is difficult for everyone, including people with I/DD. The Arc is fortunate to have the generous support of the Anthem Foundation so we can continue to provide education and resources that will help people with I/DD make healthier decisions in their daily lives,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc. According to the Centers for Disease Control, adults with disabilities have a 58% higher rate of obesity than adults without disabilities due to certain challenges individuals face with I/DD related to eating healthy, maintaining weight and being physically active. Nonetheless, since 2012, The Arc has continued to reach over 700 participants with the use of the HealthMatters curriculum and provided those with I/DD the tools and resources needed to lead healthier lives.

“We’re pleased to team with The Arc to continue to support their efforts to ensure all individuals, regardless of their abilities, have access to information that encourages a healthier lifestyle,” said Craig Samitt, MD, chief clinical officer at Anthem, Inc. “The results of their program are further evidence of the value they bring to the communities they serve to help create a healthier generations of Americans.”

The Arc advocates for and serves people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), including Down syndrome, autism, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, cerebral palsy and other diagnoses. The Arc has a network of more than 665 chapters across the country promoting and protecting the human rights of people with I/DD and actively supporting their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes and without regard to diagnosis.

About Anthem Foundation

The Anthem Foundation is the philanthropic arm of Anthem, Inc. and through charitable contributions and programs, the Foundation promotes the inherent commitment of Anthem, Inc. to enhance the health and well-being of individuals and families in communities that Anthem, Inc. and its affiliated health plans serve. The Foundation focuses its funding on strategic initiatives that address and provide innovative solutions to health care challenges, as well as promoting the Healthy Generations Program, a multi-generational initiative that targets specific disease states and medical conditions. These disease states and medical conditions include: prenatal care in the first trimester, low birth weight babies, cardiac morbidity rates, long term activities that decrease obesity and increase physical activity, diabetes prevalence in adult populations, adult pneumococcal and influenza vaccinations and smoking cessation. The Foundation also coordinates the company’s year-round Associate Giving program which provides a 50 percent match of associates’ pledges, as well as its Volunteer Time Off and Dollars for Doers community service programs. To learn more about the Anthem Foundation, please visit http://www.anthem.foundation and its blog at http://anthemfoundation.tumblr.com.

Using the Health Matters Curriculum with the Project SEARCH® Program Model

Source: HealthMatters WebEx Event Center

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 Description:    Project SEARCH is committed to supporting health and fitness education during the transition to employment. Accordingly, Project SEARCH partnered with UnitedHealthcare last year to provide Project SEARCH sites with Health Matters: The Exercise and Nutrition Health Education Curriculum for People with Developmental Disabilities. More recently, we were awarded a grant from the Ohio DD Council to study the use of the Health Matters curriculum in the context of Project SEARCH. As a first step, we surveyed Project SEARCH Instructors on their experience with the Health Matters curriculum and other health and fitness activities. The purpose was to learn about both the successes and obstacles that instructors encountered. The results of that survey will be presented here, and we plan to gather additional information from members of the audience in an informal focus group discussion. Ultimately, we plan to create and test a clear set of guidelines for integrating the Health Matters curriculum into Project SEARCH in a manner that will optimize learning of health and fitness principles without interfering with the primary Project SEARCH goal of competitive employment.
PRESENTERS  Maryellen Daston, PhD, Program Specialist, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, Cincinnati, OH. Maryellen is a technical writer with a background in biomedical research. Prior to her current position with Project SEARCH, she was involved with research in the field of developmental neuroscience. In her current position, Maryellen works with the Project SEARCH central administration team at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Maryellen manages the Project SEARCH database and is responsible for editing and writing content for the Project SEARCH website, articles for professional journals, and other communications. She is also involved with researching funding opportunities, writing grant proposals, and overseeing research related to Project SEARCH. In addition, Maryellen co-authored the book on the history, philosophy, and practices that define the Project SEARCH model, “High School Transition that Works: Lessons Learned from Project SEARCH”, Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.
PRESENTATION CONTRIBUTORS

 

  1. Julie Christensen, PhD, LMSW, Director, Center for Disabilities and Development (UCEDD), University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA. Julie is the Director of Iowa’s University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD), Center for Disabilities and Development (CDD), at the University of Iowa. Prior to joining CDD in May 2016, Dr. Christensen served as the Director of Employment Programs at Strong Center for Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD), at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Dr. Christensen’s background encompasses work in schools, not-for-profits, government and higher education. For the past 14 years, her career has centered around improving quality of life outcomes for at-risk youth, including youth with intellectual and development disabilities, through promoting employment and access to leisure and recreation opportunities in inclusive settings. She has considerable experience developing, administering, and evaluating federal, state and local grant-funded projects with an emphasis on cross-systems collaboration and systems change. She currently maintains a research faculty appointment in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, and adjunct appointments in the Department of Pediatrics, Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics and the University of Iowa School of Social Work. Her research is in the areas of employment, quality of life, and leisure and recreation participation of adolescents and young adults with IDD.
  2. Dennis Cleary, Co-Director of the Transition, Employment, and Technology (TET) Lab, Columbus, OH. Dennis is an Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy at The Ohio State University. His primary area of interest is transition services for young adults with disabilities and promoting their employment outcomes In partnership with the Transition group at the Nisonger Center, Dr. Cleary works to test and refine methods to support young adults in academic, social, and work environments through the use of technology, activity analysis, education, and job matching strategies. Dr. Cleary has received funding from the U.S. Department of Education.
  3. Karen Guo is an Occupational Therapy Doctoral Student at The Ohio State University in Columbus, OH.
  4. Beth Marks, RN, PhD, Research Associate Professor, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL. Beth is a Research Associate Professor in the Department of Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago, Associate Director for Research in the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Aging with Developmental Disabilities, and President, National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities. Beth directs research programs on empowerment and advancement of persons with disabilities. She has published numerous articles and books related to health promotion, health advocacy, and primary health care for people with disabilities. She co-produced a film entitled “Open the Door, Get ‘Em a Locker: Educating Nursing Students with Disabilities.” She has also authored two books published in 2010 entitled Health Matters: The Exercise and Nutrition Health Education Curriculum for People with Developmental Disabilitiesand Health Matters for People with Developmental Disabilities: Creating a Sustainable Health Promotion Program.
  5. Jasmina Sisirak, PhD, MPH, Research Assistant Professor, University of Illinois at Chicago; Chicago, IL. Jasmina is an Associate Director of Training and Dissemination in the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Developmental Disabilities and health (RRTCDD) in the Department of Disability and Human Development at University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). Her research interests consist of nutrition, health literacy, and health promotion for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities. She coordinates several health promotion projects in the RRTCDD; and has written publications and presented papers in the area of disability, health, and nutrition. Jasmina has co-authored two books entitled Health Matters: The Exercise and Nutrition Health Education Curriculum for People with Developmental Disabilities and Health Matters for People with Developmental Disabilities: Creating a Sustainable Health Promotion Program.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

These webinars are hosted by the HealthMatters ProgramTM in partnership with Project SEARCH® and funded by The Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Developmental Disabilities and Health (RRTCDD). The RRTCDD is funded through United States Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Community Living (ACL), National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR), Grant # 90RT5020-01-00, and a grant from the Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council.

Integrating Technology to Increase Student Interns’ Health, Fitness, and Personal Responsibilities

 

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Description:

In this webinar, we will share our success utilizing technology to improve student interns’ health, stamina, and independence. During our first year of our Project SEARCH program we have incorporated 6 Chromebooks, 2 iPads, and Fitbits for every intern. We will demonstrate how we created Google Accounts for each intern so they have access to their own G Suites to create an email address and Google Drive where they create resumes, letters, upload photos, create presentations, and share documents that they will have access to throughout their adult lives. We will also demonstrate how we utilize Google Drive to create a shared Project SEARCH Steering committee folder so all members can collaborate and have access to documents and resources at all times. We will also share how we incorporated Fitbits into daily lessons in combination with Health Matters: The Exercise and Nutrition Health Education Curriculum for People with Developmental Disabilities. Interns record all food and water consumed during the day, plus their daily activity is tracked by logging active minutes throughout the day, calories burned, total steps, and miles traveled during the day. Project SEARCH instructor is able to make connections with intern Fitbit data and Health Matters curriculum for student interns to learn the importance of nutrition and physical activity. We were also able to identify how the Fitbit can be used to make adaptations for the Interns to improve time on task and their time management skills. With the access to two iPads we incorporated a time in and time out app that student interns utilize to sign in and out for their internship rotations and for their lunch breaks. This data is incorporated into real life math lessons.

CEUs: There will be no CEUs provided for this presentation.PRESENTERS

Mason Messinger, Project SEARCH Instructor, Kalahari Resort, Pocono Manor, PA.

Dawn Diagnault, Director of Career Options and Opportunities, Human Resources Inc., Effort, PA. Dawn is the Director of Career Options and Development at the Human Resources Center, Inc. where she has been assisting individuals with disabilities in their employment goals for almost 14 years. Ms. Daignault holds a Bachelor’s degree in Disability studies from CUNY as well as an Associate’s degree in social work. She is a member of the steering committee for the Project SEARCH-Kalahari, Poconos site and serves as the supervisor of the provider agency staff.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

These webinars are hosted by the HealthMatters ProgramTM in partnership with Project SEARCH® and funded by The Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Developmental Disabilities and Health (RRTCDD). The RRTCDD is funded through United States Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Community Living (ACL), National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR), Grant # 90RT5020-01-00, and a grant from the Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council.

Mindfulness: Strategies for Building Success and Wellness in the 21st Century Workforce

 

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Date and time: Thursday, February 15, 2018 2:00-3:00 pm (Eastern Time)
Description:

This webinar will discuss the use of mindfulness strategies for building success and wellness among people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) within their worksites. “Mindfulness tools” will be reviewed for participants to incorporate with their students and employees with IDD in the classroom or in the workplace.

PRESENTER

Stefanie Patterson, Cape Cod, Riverview School’s Project SEARCH Instructor. Stefanie is a certified English and special education teacher and has been in the field of education for over 20 years. She is also a life-long yoga practitioner and is licensed through Finding Inner Peace Yoga School and is a member of the National Yoga Alliance & the Cape Cod Yoga Association [CCYA] with specialty certifications in pre/post-natal yoga, children/teen yoga and Mindfulness Meditation.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

These webinars are hosted by the HealthMatters ProgramTM in partnership with Project SEARCH® and funded by The Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Developmental Disabilities and Health (RRTCDD). The RRTCDD is funded through United States Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Community Living (ACL), National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR), Grant # 90RT5020-01-00, and a grant from the Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council.

Promoting Health and Leadership in Project SEARCH® Programs

 

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Date and time: Thursday, October 12, 2017 2:00-3:00 pm (EST)
Duration: 1 hour
Description:

For people with intellectual/developmental disabilities, maintaining health and wellness is essential to achieving and maintaining independence, participating in society, and preventing the onset of secondary health conditions. Yet, people with disabilities (PWD) experience poorer health than the general population and alarmingly higher rates of obesity and related conditions. The University of Cincinnati UCEDD and Strong Center for Developmental Disabilities at University of Rochester implemented and evaluated the evidence – based HealthMessages Program curriculum with Project SEARCH students. HealthMessages Program is a 12-week health promotion program which uses peer-to-peer facilitation to learn about physical activity and hydration; as well as making healthy choices, lifestyle changes, and setting goals. This presentation will provide a summary of lessons learned from the pilot project.

CEUs: There will be no CEUs provided for this presentation.

PRESENTERS

Julie Christensen, PhD, LMSW, Director, Center for Disabilities and Development (UCEDD), University of Iowa, Iowa. Julie is the Director of Iowa’s University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD), Center for Disabilities and Development (CDD), at the University of Iowa. Prior to joining CDD in May 2016, Dr. Christensen served as the Director of Employment Programs at Strong Center for Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD), at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Dr. Christensen’s background encompasses work in schools, not-for-profits, government and higher education. For the past 14 years, her career has centered around improving quality of life outcomes for at-risk youth, including youth with intellectual and development disabilities, through promoting employment and access to leisure and recreation opportunities in inclusive settings. She has considerable experience developing, administering, and evaluating federal, state and local grant-funded projects with an emphasis on cross-systems collaboration and systems change. She currently maintains a research faculty appointment in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, and adjunct appointments in the Department of Pediatrics, Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics and the University of Iowa School of Social Work. Her research is in the areas of employment, quality of life, and leisure and recreation participation of adolescents and young adults with IDD.

Melissa Pennise, M.P.H., Sr. Health Project Coordinator – Health Disparities, University of Rochester Medical Center, Golisano Children’s Hospital. Melissa joined Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics in 2014. She previously worked at the Monroe County Department of Public Health where she worked in the Communicable Disease Control and Prevention Division. Melissa’s public health interests include data-driven quality improvement, and access to healthcare for vulnerable populations..

PRESENTATION CONTRIBUTOR

Maryellen Daston, PhD, Program Specialist, Project SEARCH, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, Cincinnati, OH. Maryellen is is a technical writer with a background in biomedical research. Prior to her current position with Project SEARCH, she was involved with research in the field of developmental neuroscience. In her current position, Maryellen works with the Project SEARCH central administration team at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Maryellen manages the Project SEARCH database and is responsible for editing and writing content for the Project SEARCH website, articles for professional journals, and other communications. She is also involved with researching funding opportunities, writing grant proposals, and overseeing research related to Project SEARCH. In addition, Maryellen co-authored the book on the history, philosophy, and practices that define the Project SEARCH model, “High School Transition that Works: Lessons Learned from Project SEARCH”, Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

These webinars are hosted by the HealthMatters ProgramTM in partnership with Project SEARCH® and funded by The Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Developmental Disabilities and Health (RRTCDD). The RRTCDD is funded through United States Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Community Living (ACL), National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR), Grant # 90RT5020-01-00, and a grant from the Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council.

Better Health by Health Education & Sustained Employment

 

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Date and time: Thursday, September 28, 2017 2:00-3:00 pm (Eastern Time)
Duration: 1 hour
Description:

Abstract

The critical relationship between employment status and health is well established. Health education can enrich a Project SEARCH experience and increase the likelihood of sustained employment for Project SEARCH interns through better health. Join representatives from the Community Plan of Texas who will share how the Health Matters curriculum was implemented at their site. This session will encourage Project SEARCH on-site teams to understand the correlation between employment and health and wellness as well as best practices for implementing the health related curriculum.

Q & A

Question: Where are the Videos in the HealthMatters Curriculum in Lesson 8 Healthy Choices/Self-AdvocacyFreedom Equality & Justice for All” and Lesson 9 What do I think of me? Disability, Identity & Culture?” 

Response: https://www.disabilitytraining.com/product-info.php?Freedom_Equality_Justice_for_All_DVD-pid156.html

Other suggestions

  1. Self-advocacy video at a local library and found a local speaker with a disability. – http://www.zachkorbel.com/
  2. Advocating for Change Together (ACT) is Minnesota’s leader in the self-advocacy movement
  3. Self-Advocates Becoming Empowered (SABE) SABE’s Mission is to ensure that people with disabilities are treated as equals and that they are given the same decisions, choices, rights, responsibilities, and chances to speak up to empower themselves; opportunities to make new friends, and to learn from their mistakes.
  4. Freedom Equality & Justice for All (DVD) This is a remarkable package of specific, concrete strategies for promoting and strengthening self-advocacy. Be a pioneer in promoting disability as an emerging civil right movement for persons with disabilities. Learn the rich history of self-advocates, disability rights activists, and the civil rights struggles. Viewers will have a stronger sense of empowerment and understand the importance of self-advocacy to their daily lives and futures. Narrated by Cheryl Marie Wade. This site also has other really nice videos discussing discrimination specifically for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities; and, it’s a conversation that is often difficult to have.
  5. The other option is to see if anyone from the local independent living center could come as a guest speaker to talk about self-advocacy.
  6. Another idea if the video can’t be shown is to create some type of banner, poster, or something that the class can create together to show what self advocacy means to them,  how it pertains to their health, etc. This might be a project for throughout the class, and just not the first class.  I do like Beth’s idea of contacting someone from the local community independent living center and see if they would come speak.
  7. Illinois has the Illinois Self Advocacy Alliance, and the vision is “Our vision is for self-advocates to work together to get the support we need to live the life we want in the community.”  Different communities, counties, agencies have self advocacy groups in IL. Does your state have something similar in which you could have an established self advocacy group come in and speak.

PRESENTERS

  1. Jillian Hamblin, Chief Operating Officer, UnitedHealthcare Community and Plan of TX, Houston, TX. Jillian is the Chief Operating Officer for the UnitedHealthcare Community & Plan of Texas. In her current role, Jillian oversees health plan operational excellence, reporting, project management, appeals and grievances, state complaints and fair hearings, and member advocacy. Prior to assuming this role in December 2015, Jillian focused on process documentation, creation and implementation of clinical training programs, employee engagement and quality management. Jillian received a Bachelor of Science in Psychology from Baylor University.
  2. Patti Moore, Upper Valley Career Center Project SEARCH Coordinator of Upper Valley Medical Center, Sidney, OH. Patti coordinates a partnership between the Upper Valley Career Center, Upper Valley Medical Center, Koester Pavilion, Miami and Shelby County Boards of Developmental Disabilities, Capabilities Inc., and Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities. Currently in its eighth year locally, Upper Valley Project SEARCH is a high school transition program designed to provide training and education in a business setting, with the goal of competitive, community employment. This is Patti’s 25th year working in special education, 14th year as a Career Tech Special Needs Transition Coordinator, and 8th year as a Coordinator in Project SEARCH.
  3. Alexandra Needler, Project SEARCH Business Liaison, UnitedHealthcare, Houston, TX. Alexandra serves as the Project SEARCH Business Liaison while assisting UnitedHealthcare members in seeking and obtaining employment. Before joining UnitedHealthcare, Alexandra was a Special Education Teacher for nine years in Fort Bend ISD. For the last five years with FBISD, Alexandra was a Vocational Adjustment Coordinator and Transition Specialist and focused on assisting transition age students and their families to plan and prepare for postsecondary employment.
  4. Jessica Treybig, Fort Bend ISD Project SEARCH Instructor, UnitedHealthcare, Fort Bend, TX. Jessica is a Project SEARCH Teacher at UnitedHealthcare and is an Adult Transition Teacher with Fort Bend ISD and has been teaching in Fort Bend ISD for 3 years. Prior to joining Fort Bend ISD, she taught students with disabilities in the Austin area and assisted in developing a robust community based work program. Prior to teaching, she worked with adults with severe disabilities through a nationally recognized long term support provider. Jessica is a graduate of Texas State University.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

These webinars are hosted by the HealthMatters ProgramTM in partnership with Project SEARCH® and funded by The Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Developmental Disabilities and Health (RRTCDD). The RRTCDD is funded through United States Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Community Living (ACL), National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR), Grant # 90RT5020-01-00, and a grant from the Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council.